Going to college shouldn’t mean a lifetime of paying off crushing loans.

I AM NOT A LOAN is calling on colleges to pledge to reduce student debt.

Has your school signed the pledge? Find out and take action.

Latest News from the Campaign

Hey Mizzou, It’s Time to Step Up

Now that the University of Missouri’s president has resigned and the chancellor has announced that he’ll step down at the end of the year, hopefully students’ concerns will be addressed. Of all Concerned Student 1950’s list of demands, there is one that particularly impressed me because of its urgency in requiring a plan of action:

Form and Formula: How the Federal Government Distributes Aid to Students

Form and Formula: How the Federal Government Distributes Aid to Students explains the history of need analysis—the method used to determine the amount of federal aid a student receives—and the method of collecting financial data from students and families.

We All Deserve to Know Grad Rates for Pell Students

Like many students, my college decision was based largely on the price I would have to pay — tuition, financial aid, and in-state vs. out-of-state costs all had an influence. However, there was one other factor I should have paid close attention to — one that would have solidified for me and my mother whether my investment was a sound decision — and that is graduation rates for Pell Grant recipients.


Corinthian Colleges Ordered to Pay Damages to Students

Federal consumer regulators on Wednesday won a major court battle against Corinthian Colleges Inc., the former national for-profit chain that entered bankruptcy this year amid claims of defrauding students.

A federal judge in Illinois ruled that Corinthian “engaged in deceptive practices” by misleading students about their career prospects, according to documents obtained by The Wall Street Journal. 

Coalition Letter Opposing Gainful Employment Riders

A letter to all Members of Congress from more than 50 organizations expressing strong opposition to any appropriations rider that would block or delay implementation of the gainful employment regulation.

How Best To Serve Pell Students? These Colleges Know How

The Pell Partnership, our latest report, has been noted for “debunk[ing] the notion that Pell grants are somehow being wasted.” And it’s true. Quite a few colleges and universities across the country are serving low-income students well — that is, they are graduating them at the same rates as (or in some cases, even better than) their peers from high-income families.

We spoke with nearly a dozen of these schools to learn more about how they recruit, support (academically and financially), and otherwise ensure low-income students a fair chance at a postsecondary degree.

Many Colleges Aren’t Doing Enough to Fulfill the Promise of the Pell Grant Program

Several recent reports have estimated a significant gap in the college completion rates of the low-income students who receive federal Pell Grants and other college students, leading some to question the effectiveness of this investment of taxpayer dollars. But, according to a new report and online data tool we’re releasing today, the average graduation gap between Pell and non-Pell students at the institutional level is much smaller: only 5.7 percentage points.

Finally, Help for Pell Students at Closed Campuses

When colleges shutter their campuses, who’s harmed the most? Students are, especially low-income students. They are the ones with the least protection. That’s why it was so refreshing to see Rep. Bobby Scott (D-Va.) and Sen. Barbara Boxer (D-Calif.) stand up for them by introducing the “Pell Restoration Act of 2015,” which will allow Pell Grant recipients the ability to continue their education at another institution.

The Impact of Student Employment on College Completion

See how holding down a job can negatively impact Pell students' chances of graduating.

Setting the Record Straight on Pell

Since Hechinger Report released its analysis on the graduation rates of Pell Grant recipients, some people have called the effectiveness of the Pell Grant program into question. Lost in those arguments, though, are three crucial points about the program: